Ciência habilitada por dados de espécimes

Saldaña‐López, A., Vilà, M., Lloret, F., Manuel Herrera, J., & González‐Moreno, P. (2021). Assembly of species’ climatic niches of coastal communities does not shift after invasion. Journal of Vegetation Science, 32(2). doi:10.1111/jvs.12989 https://doi.org/10.1111/jvs.12989

Question: Do invasions by invasive plant species with contrasting trait profiles (Arctotheca calendula, Carpobrotus spp., Conyza bonariensis, and Opuntia dillenii) change the climatic niche of coastal plant communities? Location: Atlantic coastal habitats in Huelva (Spain). Methods: We identifi…

Follak, S., Bakacsy, L., Essl, F., Hochfellner, L., Lapin, K., Schwarz, M., … Wołkowycki, D. (2021). Monograph of invasive plants in Europe N°6: Asclepias syriaca L. Botany Letters, 1–30. doi:10.1080/23818107.2021.1886984 https://doi.org/10.1080/23818107.2021.1886984

This work synthesizes all aspects of Asclepias syriaca L. (Apocynaceae) including the taxonomy, distribution, history of introduction and spread, ecology, biology, uses and benefits, impacts on biodiversity and agriculture, legislation, and management. Asclepias syriaca is a perennial broad-leaved s…

Chauvel, B., Fried, G., Follak, S., Chapman, D., Kulakova, Y., Le Bourgeois, T., … Regnier, E. (2021). Monographs on invasive plants in Europe N° 5: Ambrosia trifida L. Botany Letters, 1–24. doi:10.1080/23818107.2021.1879674 https://doi.org/10.1080/23818107.2021.1879674

Ambrosia trifida L. (giant ragweed, Asteraceae) is native to the North American continent and was introduced into Europe and Asia at the end of the 19th century. In its native range, this tall annual species is common in riparian and ruderal habitats and is also a major weed in annual cropping syste…

Géron, C., Lembrechts, J. J., Borgelt, J., Lenoir, J., Hamdi, R., Mahy, G., … Monty, A. (2021). Urban alien plants in temperate oceanic regions of Europe originate from warmer native ranges. Biological Invasions. doi:10.1007/s10530-021-02469-9 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-021-02469-9

When colonizing new areas, alien plant species success can depend strongly on local environmental conditions. Microclimatic barriers might be the reason why some alien plant species thrive in urban areas, while others prefer rural environments. We tested the hypothesis that the climate in the native…

Bell-Doyon, P., Selva, S. B., & McMullin, T. R. (2021). Calicioid fungi and lichens from an unprotected intact forest ecosystem in Québec. Écoscience, 1–10. doi:10.1080/11956860.2021.1885804 https://doi.org/10.1080/11956860.2021.1885804

Calicioid lichens and fungi form a diverse polyphyletic group whose species richness is often associated with old-growth forests and ecological continuity. One of the last intact forest landscapes south of the 50th parallel in Québec includes the Ya’nienhonhndeh territory, which has been the focus o…

Allstädt, F. J., Koutsodendris, A., Appel, E., Rösler, W., Reichgelt, T., Kaboth-Bahr, S., … Pross, J. (2021). Late Pliocene to early Pleistocene climate dynamics in western North America based on a new pollen record from paleo-Lake Idaho. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. doi:10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1 https://doi.org/10.1007/s12549-020-00460-1

Marked by the expansion of ice sheets in the high latitudes, the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation across the Plio/Pleistocene transition at ~ 2.7 Ma represents a critical interval of late Neogene climate evolution. To date, the characteristics of climate change in North America duri…

Puchałka, R., Dyderski, M. K., Vítková, M., Sádlo, J., Klisz, M., Netsvetov, M., … Jagodziński, A. M. (2020). Black locust ( Robinia pseudoacacia L.) range contraction and expansion in Europe under changing climate. Global Change Biology. doi:10.1111/gcb.15486 https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15486

Robinia pseudoacacia is one of the most frequent non‐native species in Europe. It is a fast‐growing tree of high economic and cultural importance. On the other hand, it is an invasive species, causing changes in soil chemistry and light regime, and consequently altering the plant communities. Previo…

Shaw, E. C., Fowler, R., Ohadi, S., Bayly, M. J., Barrett, R. A., Tibbits, J., … Cousens, R. D. (2020). Explaining the worldwide distributions of two highly mobile species: Cakile edentula and Cakile maritima. Journal of Biogeography. doi:10.1111/jbi.14024 https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.14024

Aim: If we are able to determine the geographic origin of an invasion, as well as its known area of introduction, we can better appreciate the innate environmental tolerance of a species and the strength of selection for adaptation that colonizing populations have undergone. It also enables us to ma…

Deanna, R., Wilf, P., & Gandolfo, M. A. (2020). New physaloid fruit‐fossil species from early Eocene South America. American Journal of Botany, 107(12), 1749–1762. doi:10.1002/ajb2.1565 https://doi.org/10.1002/ajb2.1565

Premise: Solanaceae is a scientifically and economically important angiosperm family with a minimal fossil record and an intriguing early evolutionary history. Here, we report a newly discovered fossil lantern fruit with a suite of features characteristic of Physalideae within Solanaceae. The fossil…

Büchi, L., Cordeau, S., Hull, R., & Rodenburg, J. (2020). Vulpia myuros , an increasing threat for agriculture. Weed Research. doi:10.1111/wre.12456 https://doi.org/10.1111/wre.12456

Vulpia myuros is an annual grass species of Mediterranean origin, which has achieved a global distribution. It is a fast‐growing species, with high colonisation and competitive abilities. This species is considered an invasive weed in most countries where it has been introduced, with highly negative…